Plastic Images of Humans

By :Upenyu Wakanaka

The event was presented as it was seen as an issue that should be confronted by society at large.

Perros sat on a chair in a pure white room, silently and still, she allowed people to take pictures of her and didn’t flinch, not even for a second.

“[WO]mannequin is a continuing exploration and confrontation of the role my own political body, and the bodies of others, play within the carcass of South African society today. Like ghosts from the past and mirrors of the present – the mannequin has come to represent the border between life and death, between participant and observer, between body and commodity and the destruction and re-construction of humanity and self”. Expressed Robyn Perros in her photography exhibition at The Other Room on Friday the 5th of May 2017.

Dressed as a mannequin in an all beige, body hugging jump suit, Robyn embarked in the streets that she walks on, she interacted with society as a mannequin, and the response to that activism that she saw fit to showcase back to society.

“This self-reflective multimedia exhibition essentially explores the remoteness of the real. Peering out longingly onto the theatre of the streets – a space in which they play little active part – mannequins wear many layered narratives reflecting the ‘everyday’ perversions of society that have come to shape gender performance and identity”, she explained.

The work was the first solo work by Durban based photographer Robyn Perros.

The exhibition revealed a lot on how society deals with mannequins, how shops deal with mannequins, so with their employees in those retail shop. Once the use of thereof is done, mannequins are tossed aside and replaced.

It also revealed that nothing is certain, as those mannequins are the structure of humans. Perros sat on a chair in a pure white room, silently and still, she allowed people to take pictures of her and didn’t flinch, not even for a second, just like a mannequin

a space in which they play little active part – mannequins wear many layered narratives reflecting the ‘everyday’ perversions of society that have come to shape gender performance and identity”, she explained.

 

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